Iron is the key

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  • #213
    Dan S
    Keymaster

    I believe that iron is the key to eliminating protomyxzoa infection. And I think its likely critical for other chronic infectious diseases (except Lyme/borrelia burgdorferi infection. see below).

    I have found a number of remarkable papers on the importance of iron in infectious diseases. This important information has been overlooked by medical researchers and practitioners working on chronic infectious diseases. Iron status is hugely important.

    Iron is the critical, growth-limiting nutrient for almost all infectious pathogens. That includes protozoans, fungi, and bacteria. Pathogens can readily access all other needed nutrients from human hosts: amino acids, sugars, minerals (calcium, magnesium, zinc etc). All these nutrients are readily available in human tissues. Iron is the one nutrient that is lacking, and iron scarcity therefore inhibits the growth of pathogens. Iron is the growth-limiting nutrient.

    There is a biochemical tug-of-war for iron between host and pathogens. It doesnt matter if the host is human, another mammal, reptile or whatever. Host and pathogen battle for iron. Even horseshoe crabs have biochemical mechanisms for sequestering iron and keeping it away from pathogens.

    High iron content renders a host much more susceptible to systemic infection. The science is very clear about this. See the attached papers. Anemic people are resistant to infection. Iron supplementation causes infection. This fact suggests a novel approach to treating protomyxzoa: reducing body iron load. If increasing iron status causes infection, will reducing iron status help cure it?

    Fortunately, removing iron from the body is easy. Its done by bloodletting. Most iron in the body is present in the form of hemoglobin. 500mL of blood contains about 250mg of elemental iron. Simply bleed and throw away the blood, and you reduce your iron levels.

    Dr Fry states that protomyxzoa is closely related to malaria and babesia, pathogens with a particularly high affinities and high requirements for iron. Both live in the blood and for at least part of their life cycles they consume red blood cells or live inside red blood cells where iron is concentrated. Protomyxzoa is a “blood-loving” parasite, he says.

    Dr Fry states: “…at first I thought it was babesiosis, and over the years, and a lot of money, and a lot of time, turns out it was actually a malaria-like organism with an extremely complex lifecycle that forms biofilm communities in the blood, it is a blood-loving parasite. And after mapping the genome of it, and we didn’t really name it until we had done that — it’s probably a new genus, in the phylum [???]. You know, similar to malaria, similar to babesiosis, even more complex genetically, sort of in between a helminth [parasitic worm] and a protozoan. ”

    The literature on iron, and the affinity of protomyxzoa for blood (and therefore iron) demands that iron reduction be considered a possible treatment.

    The fastest and most effective way to reduce iron levels is by phlebotomy, or bloodletting. I have done two blood draws on myself so far: one 550mL draw and one 700mL draw (2 weeks apart). Both produced excellent results: my symptoms were immediately reduced and I experienced increased energy, better sleep and higher exercise tolerance. Before the bloodletting, my iron numbers were (all these numbers are in normal ranges):

    ferritin 87 ng/mL,

    serum iron 90 mcg/dL,

    total iron binding capacity (TIBC) 285 mcg/dL and

    hemoglobin 13.8 gm/dL

    After the 550mL and 700mL draws (test done 1 week after second draw), my iron numbers were:

    ferritin: 27

    serun iron: 36

    TIBC: 340

    Hemoglobin: 12.7

    A useful measure of iron availability is serum iron/TIBC. This went from 90/285=0.315 to 36/340=0.105, a 2/3 drop! Iron is now much less available in my blood. There is less of it, and more iron-binding substances are binding up the iron that remains.

    Another thing that happened after the second blood draw was the familiar dried blood mark appeared under my most affected fingernail. This happened despite the fact that I was not taking any antibiotics at the time. This is remarkable. In the past, such black marks appear ONLY when taking high doses of the most effective antibiotics. And the appearance of these black marks always correlates with a reduction in symptoms, and healing of the fingernail. It is always a good sign.

    And all this correlates with me feeling much better. And I stopped taking antibiotics a few days after the first blood draw.

    I’m not sure how much lower I should go. Reducing iron too much will impair immune function and therefore will be counter-productive. I dont know what the optimum level is, but i expect its at a level that is as low as possible without substantially affecting immune function. And thats probably at the “borderline anemic” level. But I am definitely NOT anemic yet. I still have “normal” iron status. I think I will do one 400mL blood draw later this week. That should make me borderline or slightly anemic. I expect it will reduce ferritin to about the 5-10 range. At that point, I will restart the AAD antibiotic combination.

    I am now of the opinion that the ancient, maligned, ridiculed and disparaged practice of bloodletting is actually an effective medicine! Bloodletting was widely used by many ancient cultures, and in ayurvedic and chinese medicine. They got the reasons wrong, but the therapy right. Science shows that its almost certainly effective for chronic infectious diseases. My personal experience with bloodletting is that its definitely effective. Its the most effective non-antibiotic treatment I have tried.

    Consuming phytate (IP6 or inositol hexaphosphate) will also reduce iron levels, but this method is very slow. It takes months, and I doubt that anemic levels can be achieved with IP6 alone unless its taken for many months or maybe years. My ferritin was almost certainly higher than 87 when i started taking IP6. Unfortunately, I do not know what my ferritin number was before i started taking IP6. Bloodletting is dramatically more effective than IP6.

    Note: No conventional doctor will prescribe bloodletting/phlebotomy for the reasons outlined above. Even the alternative ones will be hesitant. Phlebotomy is only used by conventional doctors for specific conditions such as hemachromatosis. And in this case, they generally will not reduce ferritin below 300 or 200 or so. Asking to get phlebotomies to bring ferritin down to 5 or 10 will be a non-starter. No doctor will do it. They will think you are crazy for asking.

    One could have blood drawn at a blood donation center. But this is unethical if you have a blood-born infectious disease. This is especially true in the case of PR, because this pathogen is not tested for in blood. Donating blood with PR will infect other people. One could donate a unit of blood, and then inform the blood donation place that the blood is contaminated, but you can only get away with this once.

    In view of these considerations, I decided to perform the phlebotomies at home with my own equipment. PM me if you need instructions on how to do it.

    • This topic was modified 7 years, 5 months ago by Dan S.
    • This topic was modified 7 years, 5 months ago by Dan S.
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    #219
    Dan S
    Keymaster

    I mentioned that Lyme (Borrelia Burgdorferi infection) is an exception to the rule about iron. The BB organism is apparently unique among pathogens in that it does not require iron for growth. BB apparently uses manganese in places where iron is used in other organisms.

    It seems that the lack of a need for iron may be one of the characteristics that makes BB such a remarkable pathogen.

    BB is the only known pathogen that does not require iron. This would suggest that bloodletting would not be helpful for BB infection.

    See the attached paper.

    • This reply was modified 7 years, 5 months ago by Dan S.
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    #221
    Dan S
    Keymaster

    Iron is also important for producing biofilm. This is relevant to protomyxzoa (PR) because PR relies on biofilm and is a copious biofilm producer. Biofilm is essential for the pathogenesis of PR.

    See the two attached papers on iron and biofilm.

     

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    #225
    Dan S
    Keymaster

    It turns out that reducing iron levels by phlebotomy has another advantage: reducing cancer risk. High iron promotes cancer. In the study described in the attached paper, subjects donated blood only once every 6 months (according to study protocol; subjects missed about 30% of these phlebotomy appointments). Cancer was reduced by about 40% and all cause mortality was reduced by about 50%!

    This was a good quality study, with highly significant results.

    So, phlebotomy has beneficial side effects. There is little reason to be concerned about it.

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    #252
    lilneeds
    Member

    Hi Dan-

    How can I PM you for instructions? Thanks!

    #253
    Dan S
    Keymaster

    Whoops I thought this website had pm functionality.

     

    Email me at dodanimal at gmail co

    #256
    Dan S
    Keymaster

    Actually I think I will write up some instructions on how to do bloodletting and publish it. I can’t do that now because I am out of town until next week.

    I removed another 600ml and still have no sign of anemia. So that’s about 2000ml in the last 5 weeks.

    d

    #268
    Christian
    Member

    Hi Dan

     

    Thank you for an excellent forum on this topic!

     

    I am curious-  how are you doing on your blood-letting treatment? Will we see your instructions ?

     

    Thanks

    Christian

    #271
    detter
    Member

    Dan, I am curious if you have a Dr. assisting you with the bloodletting and if so what he/she thinks of your research and ideas about Iron and PR. I would also be curious to know what Dr. fry would think of this. Your discovery is very significant!  Have you thought of talking with him about it?

    #272
    Dan S
    Keymaster

    Im up to about 2600ml so far. I am pretty sure its helping.

     

    My issues are complicated, however. I think i have a combination of dysbiosis (from years  of taking various antibiotics), and PR infection.the symptoms that i think are from PR are at a very low level. The PR might even be gone at this point, because i am not presently taking antibiotics And my condition is pretty stable, though not normalized. i believe that my present symptoms are from dysbiosis. Im working on a few fixes for that and will have an update at some point in the next couple months.

     

     

     

    #273
    Dan S
    Keymaster

    Both my primary care dr and infectious disease specialist are on board with the bloodletting/iron reduction. They have seen the papers. However, they cannot facilitate the bloodlettin they would be at gret professional risk. The medical profession is on a constant witch hunt for anyone with new innovative ideas.

     

     

    • This reply was modified 7 years, 4 months ago by Dan S.
    #274
    Dan S
    Keymaster

    I just do it at home with an 18ga catheter, tourniquet and tubing. It requires someone to do the venipuncture, though. Maybe i will put a video on youtube showing exactly how to do it. If you get the puncture right, it only takes about 15 minutes to drain 500ml or more. Im going to do it again prob next week, and that will bring me up to about 3200ml in the last couple months. I have no symptoms of anemia yet, but i need to get my iron numbers again. Though my primary doc cannot do or prescribe the bloodletting she knows what i am doing and is facilitating it with the laboratory at her office. She just wants me to get my blood iron numbers checked regularly. The most important one is the hemoglobin number. I started at 13.8. Normal is 12 and above. Severe anemia is about 8. Thats too low as it will inhibit immune function. Im going to guess that maybe 10-11 range may be ideal for inhibiting PR.

    #275
    Dan S
    Keymaster

    My infectious disease specialist has started recommending a low iron diet for his patients, especially the ones with PR. I think a low iron diet is not enough. The human body has no mechanism aside from bleeding to remove iron. One could take phytate To remove iron, but thats slow and will take forever. May take years. Bleeding is the way to go.

    #276
    Dan S
    Keymaster

    Yes i have passed this along to dr fry, indirectly. I emailed the papers to his office. They said they were completely unaware of the iron issue. I asked dr fry to cal me to discuss, but he neVer did. I dont know if dr fry even received the papers personally.

    #278
    detter
    Member

    Dan,

    So this is confusing!! You are implying in your blogs that the bloodletting reduces your iron count which in return is helping your PR symptoms. Though you also state your PR is not a problem anymore or the symptoms you” think” are PR!! Have you ever had your blood work done at Fry Labs to confirm if you have PR?

     

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